Sunday, August 17, 2014

WHY DO AMERICAN MOVIEGOERS HATE AMERICA?

So I see that The Giver finished fifth at the box office this weekend:
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Guardians of the Galaxy held on to the top two spots at the box office this weekend....

In a surprising development, The Expendables 3 wasn't the highest-grossing newcomer of the weekend. That honor went to Let's Be Cops, which took third place....

Playing at 3,003 theaters, The Giver opened in fifth place with an estimated $12.8 million. While it came in on the high end of these comparisons, The Giver still essentially wound up in the same realm as recent young-adult flops The Host, The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones and Beautiful Creatures....
If The Giver flopped, you know what that means, don't you? It means that America's moviegoing public hates freedom. Just ask FreedomWorks blogger Logan Albright, who told us a few days ago that The Giver "brings new life to themes of liberty":
The Giver is that rare film that successfully merges conservative and libertarian themes with superior craftsmanship and genuine entertainment. The celebration of individual differences, of emotion, of life, of freedom, and of the general messiness that is the human condition strikes deep, as we instinctively reject the placid, yet soulless, sameness of a society controlled from the top down....

Following in the grand tradition of 1984, Fahrenheit 451, and Ayn Rand's Anthem, the Giver reminds us all of the dangers of a too-powerful state. Regardless of how well-meaning such a society's architects may be, the rigid control of every citizen's life in order to preserve "the greater good" is chilling. It also rings increasingly true in today's world of government spying, compulsory health insurance, and a culture of political correctness gone mad.
Naturally, "compulsory health insurance" is totalitarian, and obviously the first step toward a society in which no one ever sees color or feels unbridled joy because an all -powerful central government won't allow it.

It's not just FreedomWorks. Sarah Palin lavished praise on the movie in a review on her new TV channel, frequently invoking Ronald Reagan, and describing the movie's tyrannical government as basically just like ours:
"'The Giver' depicts a society where the government has grown well beyond an anti-state," Palin says. "The government in the movie limits every aspect of life -- where to live, what to wear, what to eat, who to marry -- to make a society that doesn't have pain or risk, supposedly, to create some kind of utopia. Sound familiar?"
If your response to "Sound familiar?" is "No, not really," you must be a dirty, stinking liberal. As Kira Davis at Independent Journal Review tells us,
However futuristic The Giver is meant to be, it is an absolute reflection of what we see happening in modern American society. A few people are deciding for the majority of us what is right and what is wrong when it comes to our own lives. The Community, like too many leaders these days, thinks that freedom means "freedom from" -- freedom from violence, danger, religions -- or inflaming passions such as free speech and even love.
I guess two of FDR's "Four Freedoms" were totalitarian, too, because they're "freedom from" -- freedom from want and freedom from fear. (And you were a fascist, Norman Rockwell, for painting all four of them!)

Ahh, but America rejected "the most pro-American movie of 2014" (Townhall.com). So we're doomed. Enjoy love and color while you can, sheeple.

3 comments:

Victor said...

What?
They ran out of Ayn Rand books to make movies out of?

flarenut said...

Last I looked, dictating things like where people could live and whom they could marry was pretty much a conservative project, no? (And if you include support of monopolies in the food industry and helping kill inspections, that would extend to controlling what people eat.)

I guess it's OK as long as you outsource it.

Jim Donahue said...

Well, at least "Atlas Shrugged Part 3" is opening soon. Certainly, that will set the box office on fire--just like the first two parts.