Thursday, October 23, 2014

JONI ERNST, GUNS, AND TWO DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF WHITE PRIVILEGE

You've probably read about this:
Joni Ernst, the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in Iowa, said during an NRA event in 2012 that she would use a gun to defend herself from the government.

"I have a beautiful little Smith & Wesson, 9 millimeter, and it goes with me virtually everywhere," Ernst said at the NRA and Iowa Firearms Coalition Second Amendment Rally in Searsboro, Iowa. "But I do believe in the right to carry, and I believe in the right to defend myself and my family -- whether it's from an intruder, or whether it's from the government, should they decide that my rights are no longer important."



In an obvious way, the fact that Ernst can say this and still be the favorite to win a U.S. Senate seat is a clear example of white privilege. Imagine a pronouncement like this being greeted with shrugs (as it almost certainly will be in Iowa on Election Day) if it had been uttered by a left-leaning black candidate a couple of years prior to running for office.

But there's another way this is an example of white privilege. At The Washington Post, Paul Waldman asks:
... if Ernst is talking about some hypothetical situation in which government's disregard for her rights may necessitate an armed response it's fair to ask her: What exactly is it? Is she saying that when law enforcement officers come to arrest her on some trumped-up charge, instead of submitting and fighting the charges in court she'll shoot those officers? Who else is an appropriate target here? Members of Congress who pass laws taking away her rights? FBI agents? Who?
Here's the thing: Generally speaking, she thinks there's no such circumstance. Ernst feels free to make this reckless statement, to a crowd that didn't find it the least bit objectionable, because she feels pretty safe in the assumption that she'll never be called to back those words up with actions. That's because she lives in a country where, regardless of all the hotheaded rhetoric, the government never really tyrannizes people like her and her audience, i.e., heartland white people of some means.

If Ernst and the crowd she was addressing were African-American, and had to get used to staggeringly high incarceration rates, as well as routine stop-and-frisk episodes and traffic stops for themselves and their children, they'd have to ask themselves if they were really so damn brave that they'd take up arms against the government. But they don't have to worry about that. So Ernst can just let loose this way with a barrage of irresponsible talk about insurrection.

Oh, sure, there was that crazy David Koresh a generation ago, and there was Randy Weaver at Ruby Ridge shortly before that. But in this century there's been one situation of this kind involving conservative white people: the standoff at Cliven Bundy's ranch. And in that situation, Bundy and his pals didn't actually have reason to put a bullet in anyone because the Bundyites were conservative heartland whites, and a government run by a widely despised black guy, and with an even more loathed black guy as attorney general, was never really going to risk messing with them.

Whether they'll admit it or not, white right-wing heartlanders know that the jackbooted government thuggery they have Walter Mitty fantasies about resisting happens to them only after they engage in the most extreme provocation. So they talk the talk, knowing they won't ever to have to walk the walk.

2 comments:

349d7fa6-5ae0-11e4-a79a-23620c60b7c9 said...

Ernst is one scary bitch. The jackbooted government she describes is the one she would help to create.

Victor said...

Joni Ernst:
'HOG castrator for the world' *

"I believe in the right to defend myself and my family — whether it’s from an intruder, or whether it’s from the government, should they decide that my rights are no longer important.”

So, since you're already IN the government, Ms. Ernst, and should you continue on in it, if all of a sudden the outlook within the government on gun-control should shift 180 degrees to a more limited approach to access to guns - and for political expediency at that time, you agree - would you shoot yourself in your feckin' head with your "beautiful little Smith & Wesson, 9 millimeter?

Or, in protest, would you shoot yourself in your feckin' head with your "beautiful little Smith & Wesson, 9 millimeter?

Do it now anyhow!
Just to prove your point!!!
Either way!!!!!